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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A recently identified piece of cryptojacking malware includes the necessary functionality to launch DDoS attacks. [Read More]
A group of cybercriminals managed to hide their web skimmer in the EXIF metadata of an image that was then surreptitiously loaded by compromised online stores. [Read More]
Australian beverage company Lion says there is no evidence that hackers have stolen information from its systems, but the hackers claim they have and are threatening to leak it. [Read More]
A man who developed distributed denial of service (DDoS) botnets based on the source code of Mirai was sentenced to 13 months in federal prison. [Read More]
A newly identified piece of malware is being distributed embedded in tax payment software that some businesses operating in China are required to install. [Read More]
The threat actor behind the Sodinokibi ransomware was observed scanning the victim networks for credit card or point of sale (POS) software. [Read More]
The threat actor behind the Dridex Trojan has released a new ransomware following months of development. [Read More]
The XORDDoS and Kaiji DDoS botnets have started targeting exposed Docker servers, Trend Micro warns. [Read More]
Malicious Chrome extensions employed in a massive global surveillance campaign have been downloaded by millions before removal. [Read More]
Targeted attacks delivering a new piece of malware leveraged an exploit previously associated with the Russian-linked Turla hacking group. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Malware

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Zeus 2.1 now boasts features that help it avoid analysis and hostile takeover from law enforcement, researchers, or competing cybercriminal organizations.
David Harley's picture
David Harley chimes in with some thoughts on the latest developments from the AMTSO and the Anti-Malware Industry.
David Harley's picture
The vulnerability in Windows Shell’s parsing of .LNK (shortcut) files presents some interesting and novel features in terms of its media lifecycle as well as its evolution from zero-day to patched vulnerability. For most of us, the vulnerability first came to light in the context of Win32/Stuxnet, malware that in itself presents some notable quirks.
David Harley's picture
The anti-malware industry sometimes sees more complicated problems than you might imagine, and they can’t all be fixed by tweaking detection algorithms or giving the marketing team a productivity bonus.
Mike Lennon's picture
Malvertising - Popular websites, blogs, and ad networks are fast becoming the preferred means of cybercriminals, identity thieves, and hackers to steal consumer information and distribute malicious content.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Anti-virus products scan for malware in two ways. They look for sequences of bits that are found in programs that are known to be “evil” (but which are not commonly found in “good” programs)...