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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

France's privacy watchdog gave the green light Tuesday to a government-backed cellphone app that will alert users if they have been in contact with an infected person. [Read More]
US lawmakers this week will vote on an amendment to the surveillance bill known as the USA FREEDOM Reauthorization Act that would limit law enforcement access to people’s search and browsing histories. [Read More]
A security flaw in Qatar's controversial mandatory coronavirus contact tracing app exposed sensitive information of more than one million users, rights group Amnesty International warned. [Read More]
The FTC has approved a settlement with Canadian smart lock maker Tapplock, which allegedly falsely claimed that its devices were designed to be “unbreakable.” [Read More]
In a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives, several Internet organizations are urging for an amendment to a surveillance bill to prohibit warrantless collection of search and browsing history. [Read More]
Britain will reduce Chinese tech giant Huawei's controversial involvement in its 5G network in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. [Read More]
Encrypted messaging service Signal has announced the introduction of a new feature that allows users to recover their data if they switch to a new device. [Read More]
On May 22, Zoom will share a draft of the cryptographic design it wants to use for its future end-to-end encryption feature. [Read More]
Google this week released Chrome 83 to the stable channel with patches for a total of 38 vulnerabilities, with improved Safe Browsing protection, and updated privacy and security controls. [Read More]
Facebook has agreed to pay a Can$9 million (US$6.5 million) fine for making false or misleading claims about its privacy settings, Canada's competition watchdog announced Tuesday. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Alastair Paterson's picture
For companies based in the U.S. with customers and files in many different countries, reconciling conflicting practices and laws is likely to remain a serious headache for years to come.
Jim Gordon's picture
Individuals and security professionals should have a 360 mindset and know the actions needed to take in the pursuit of data protection and the preservation of privacy.
David Holmes's picture
Architects and IT security teams are looking for technology evolutions to help them manage real problems in endpoint storage and messaging.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
Regardless of which framework you use, it’s crucial to operationalize it in the context of your organization’s unique environment and risk factors.
Laurence Pitt's picture
In the coming years the data protection and privacy landscape will change dramatically, improving the experience for us as individuals but potentially making things more complex for businesses.
Alastair Paterson's picture
With more legislation expected, every company should ensure they have a robust framework in place along with strong data mapping capabilities.
Torsten George's picture
By implementing the core pillars of GDPR, organizations can assure they meet the mandate’s requirements while strengthening their cyber security posture.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.