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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A security flaw in Qatar's controversial mandatory coronavirus contact tracing app exposed sensitive information of more than one million users, rights group Amnesty International warned. [Read More]
The FTC has approved a settlement with Canadian smart lock maker Tapplock, which allegedly falsely claimed that its devices were designed to be “unbreakable.” [Read More]
In a letter to the U.S. House of Representatives, several Internet organizations are urging for an amendment to a surveillance bill to prohibit warrantless collection of search and browsing history. [Read More]
Encrypted messaging service Signal has announced the introduction of a new feature that allows users to recover their data if they switch to a new device. [Read More]
On May 22, Zoom will share a draft of the cryptographic design it wants to use for its future end-to-end encryption feature. [Read More]
Google this week released Chrome 83 to the stable channel with patches for a total of 38 vulnerabilities, with improved Safe Browsing protection, and updated privacy and security controls. [Read More]
Facebook has agreed to pay a Can$9 million (US$6.5 million) fine for making false or misleading claims about its privacy settings, Canada's competition watchdog announced Tuesday. [Read More]
Privacy advocates warn that the danger of creating new government surveillance powers for the pandemic, including through contact tracing apps, could lead to much bigger problems in the future. [Read More]
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg on Monday urged the European Union to take the lead in setting global standards for tech regulation or risk seeing countries follow China as a model. [Read More]
A coalition of consumer groups filed a complaint Thursday with US regulators claiming the popular video app TikTok has failed to live up to an agreement last year limiting data collection from children. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Alastair Paterson's picture
For companies based in the U.S. with customers and files in many different countries, reconciling conflicting practices and laws is likely to remain a serious headache for years to come.
Jim Gordon's picture
Individuals and security professionals should have a 360 mindset and know the actions needed to take in the pursuit of data protection and the preservation of privacy.
Laurence Pitt's picture
In the coming years the data protection and privacy landscape will change dramatically, improving the experience for us as individuals but potentially making things more complex for businesses.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.