Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Apple has filed a lawsuit seeking to hold NSO Group accountable for hacking into Apple’s iOS mobile platform with so-called zero-click exploits to spy on researchers, journalists, activists, dissidents, academics, and government officials. [Read More]
WhatsApp is adding more details to its privacy policy and flagging that information for European users, after Irish regulators slapped the chat service with a record fine for breaching strict EU data privacy rules. [Read More]
The newly discovered Android banking trojan targets international banks and five different cryptocurrency services. [Read More]
Start-up tokenization firm introduces a solution to the Right to be Forgotten (RTBF) problem inherent in new data protection and privacy legislation. [Read More]
Public cloud data protection provider Laminar has emerged from stealth with $32 million in Series A funding led by Insight Partners. [Read More]
Microsoft-owned GitHub warns that a pair of newly discovered vulnerabilities continue to expose the soft underbelly of the open-source software supply chain. [Read More]
Zoom ships multiple security bulletins calling special attention to a pair of “high-risk” bugs affecting its on-prem meeting connector software and the popular Keybase Client. [Read More]
U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris on Wednesday announced support for the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace. [Read More]
Adobe patches a security flaw in the RoboHelp Server product, warning that corporate environments are exposed to arbitrary code execution attacks. [Read More]
Since mid-September, at least nine global entities across multiple sectors were compromised in attacks exploiting a ManageEngine ADSelfService Plus security flaw. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

rss icon

Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.
Gant Redmon's picture
While you can’t do anything about the terms when using a product or service, you can decide whether or not to get into the contractual relationship in the first place and what information you share if you do click through.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Gant Redmon's picture
Parenting, much like our legal system, is founded on three basic steps: 1) establish rules, 2) monitor compliance, and 3) modify non-compliant behavior.
Gant Redmon's picture
In the spirit of "trust but verify", you may occasionally scroll through your kid’s email or Google+ account, or pick up their phone to glance at recent texts. One would think this behavior it protected by law. Surprisingly, wiretap laws don’t have carve outs for parental snooping.