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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Hackers stole the personal data of around 1.4 million people who took Covid-19 tests in the Paris region in the middle of 2020, hospital officials in the French capital disclosed on Wednesday. [Read More]
In addition to one-on-one phone call encryption, Zoom announces Verified Identity and a Bring Your Own Key (BYOK) offering. [Read More]
The patch comes exactly one week after the Redmond, Wash. software giant acknowledged the CVE-2021-40444 security defect and confirmed the existence of in-the-wild exploitation via booby-trapped Microsoft Office documents. [Read More]
China's new data privacy law, the Personal Information Protection Law (PIPL), will provide solid protection for its people’s personal information nationally, internationally the law can be used as a weapon. [Read More]
Tenable makes its priciest acquisition to date and expands its product portfolio with capabilities to detect security problems in code before they become operational security risks. [Read More]
Google introduced Private Compute Services for Android, a new suite of services designed to improve privacy in the Android operating system. [Read More]
Secure email provider ProtonMail has been strongly criticized for providing the IP address of a customer to Swiss authorities, ultimately leading to the arrest of a climate activist in France. But simply blaming ProtonMail misses the important lessons of this case. [Read More]
The U.S. government's CISA and OMB are seeking the public’s opinion on draft zero trust strategic and technical documentation. [Read More]
Microsoft patches a vulnerability in Azure Container Instances that could allow access to other customers’ information. [Read More]
Zoho confirms attacks against an authentication bypass vulnerability in its ADSelfService Plus product. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.