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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Zoho confirms attacks against an authentication bypass vulnerability in its ADSelfService Plus product. [Read More]
The Android Security Bulletin for September 2021 includes patches for a total of 40 vulnerabilities, including seven that are rated critical. [Read More]
The German government admitted that its federal police service used controversial Israeli spyware known as Pegasus [Read More]
Apple will delay the rollout of its controversial new child pornography protection tools, accused by some of undermining the privacy of its devices and services. [Read More]
The social media advertising giant has shared an updated payout guideline for vulnerability hunters to better understand its bounty decisions. [Read More]
Software vendor SolarWinds failed to enable ASLR, an anti-exploitation feature available since the launch of Windows Vista 15 years ago. The oversight that made it easy for attackers to launch targeted malware attacks in July this year. [Read More]
Israel’s foreign minister has played down criticism of the country’s regulation of the cyberespionage firm NSO Group but vowed to step up efforts to ensure the company’s controversial spyware doesn’t fall into the wrong hands. [Read More]
The application can be used to monitor someone’s phone use, online activity, and even physical movements, but exposes users to stalkers and abuse, the FTC argues. [Read More]
Ireland imposed a 225-million-euro fine on Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp for breaching EU data privacy laws after European regulators demanded the penalty be increased. [Read More]
Israeli software giant Check Point joins the cybersecurity shopping spree with a definitive deal to acquire Avanan [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.