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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Privacy watchdogs in Britain and Australia have opened a joint investigation into facial recognition company Clearview AI over its use of personal data “scraped” off social media platforms and other websites. [Read More]
A federal judge on Tuesday rejected a challenge by internet service providers and upheld Maine’s “opt-in” web privacy law, one of the strictest in the nation. [Read More]
Facebook, WhatsApp and Telegram will deny law enforcement requests for user data in Hong Kong as they assess the impact of a new national security law. [Read More]
A US Senate panel Thursday approved legislation aimed at combatting online child exploitation as civil liberties activists warned the measure could lead to an array of constitutional and privacy problems. [Read More]
Zoom announces the progress it has made in terms of security and privacy, but experts believe the company still faces many challenges. [Read More]
Details on a macOS privacy protections bypass method were published this week, more than six months after Apple was informed of the issue, but failed to deliver a fix. [Read More]
An Elasticsearch database pertaining to e-learning platform OneClass was found to expose data on over one million students and lecturers. [Read More]
TikTok denies sharing Indian users' data with the Chinese government, after New Delhi banned the wildly popular app in a sharp deterioration of relations with Beijing two weeks after a deadly border clash. [Read More]
California voters will weigh in this November on whether to expand a landmark data privacy law, alter a decades-old law that limits property taxes on businesses and exempt ride-hail giants Uber and Lyft from a new state labor law. [Read More]
Google said that starting June 24, 2020, it will automatically and continuously delete web and app activity and location history for new users after 18 months. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Travis Greene's picture
GDPR is proving disruptive for European citizens who are no longer able to interact with services from outside the EU. And the compliance costs can be significant as well. But are there legitimate concerns of overreach?
Lance Cottrell's picture
Failing to consistently use identity hiding technologies is the most common way to blow your online cover. Just one failure to use your misattribution tools can instantly connect your alias to your real identity.
Preston Hogue's picture
With each new digital industry, process or service comes a new data source that can be compiled and cross referenced, introducing new ways to see into people’s lives, activities and business operations.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Facial recognition systems are becoming cheaper, better, easier to use, and more widely deployed, while social media platforms are creating an ocean of easily identifiable faces that are widely accessible.
Steven Grossman's picture
How can a company protect its information and operations without running askew of data privacy laws and the concerns of its customers?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.