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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Proton Technologies is deploying a new system to ensure that its email and VPN applications continue to be accessible even in scenarios where governments or ISPs attempt to block them. [Read More]
House lawmakers prepared to extend surveillance authorities that expire this month, releasing legislation that represents a rare bipartisan agreement after members of both parties said they wanted to ensure the tools preserved civil liberties. [Read More]
Facebook and other tech companies need to be regulated like the tobacco industry, warned Christopher Wylie, the whistleblower who exposed the Cambridge Analytica scandal. [Read More]
Firefox 74 brings several security improvements, including patches, a new add-ons policy, improved privacy, and versions 1.0 and 1.1 of the TLS protocol disabled by default. [Read More]
Match Group, the parent company of dating apps such as Tinder, has publicly endorsed a US bill others in the tech industry fear will erode online privacy and speech in the name of fighting child abuse. [Read More]
Australia's privacy watchdog announced legal action against Facebook Monday for alleged "systematic failures" exposing more than 300,000 Australians to a data breach by Cambridge Analytica. [Read More]
Facebook has sued domain registrar Namecheap over its refusal to provide information on tens of domains that impersonated the social media company. [Read More]
UK telecommunications and media company Virgin Media has exposed the personal information of roughly 900,000 people. [Read More]
US lawmakers propose legislation that could see internet companies held legally responsible for content on their platforms if they don't do enough to police child pornography. [Read More]
T-Mobile is sending notifications to its customers to inform them of a data breach that resulted in some of their personal information being compromised. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Alastair Paterson's picture
For companies based in the U.S. with customers and files in many different countries, reconciling conflicting practices and laws is likely to remain a serious headache for years to come.
Jim Gordon's picture
Individuals and security professionals should have a 360 mindset and know the actions needed to take in the pursuit of data protection and the preservation of privacy.
Laurence Pitt's picture
In the coming years the data protection and privacy landscape will change dramatically, improving the experience for us as individuals but potentially making things more complex for businesses.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.