Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

President Benjamin Netanyahu on Thursday denied a media report that Israel spied on cell phones in the vicinity of the White House -- and President Donald Trump said he believed him. [Read More]
An analysis of Android flashlight apps available in Google Play reveals that they request an average of 25 permissions, with some requesting up to 77 permissions when installed. [Read More]
In an attempt to improve the privacy and security of its users, Google is getting ready to bring DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) to the Chrome browser. [Read More]
Telegram was found to breach users’ privacy by failing to remove images from a device’s local storage when the sender selects to delete them for all recipients. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities discovered by a researcher in Verizon Wireless systems could have been exploited to access 2 million customer contracts. [Read More]
A small fine of $20,000 in Sweden highlights a potential problem for the use of biometrics in security throughout Europe, including American firms with offices in Europe. [Read More]
The Australian Tide Foundation has announced details of a distributed ledger technology (DLT) password protection system using 'splintering' to deliver password security that is massively greater than the traditional central hashed database. [Read More]
South Korean-based industrial manufacturer DK-LOK was found to leak internal and external communications, including customer data. [Read More]
Data protection firm BigID raises $50 million in a Series C funding round, which brings the total raised by the company to nearly $100 million. [Read More]
Phone numbers linked to more than 400 million Facebook accounts were reportedly found online, but the social media giant believes the actual number of impacted accounts is roughly half of that. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

rss icon

Jim Gordon's picture
Individuals and security professionals should have a 360 mindset and know the actions needed to take in the pursuit of data protection and the preservation of privacy.
Laurence Pitt's picture
In the coming years the data protection and privacy landscape will change dramatically, improving the experience for us as individuals but potentially making things more complex for businesses.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.