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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

San Francisco became the first US city to ban use of facial recognition technology by police or other government agencies. [Read More]
ZombieLoad, RIDL and Fallout: Intel processors are vulnerable to more speculative execution side-channel attacks that can allow malware to obtain sensitive data. [Read More]
Twitter warned that a bug in Twitter for iOS led to the company inadvertently collecting location data and sharing it with a third-party. [Read More]
New Citizens Lab report details Iran-linked multilingual campaign aimed at seeding anti-Saudi, anti-Israel and anti-American stories across the internet. [Read More]
Facebook patches a serious WhatsApp zero-day vulnerability (CVE-2019-3568) that can and has been exploited to remotely install spyware on phones by calling the targeted device. [Read More]
There is a growing number of cases highlighting how key evidence needed to solve crimes could sit in computers a continent away under completely different legal jurisdiction. [Read More]
Facebook is suing South Korean data analytics firm Rankwave to make sure it isn't breaking the leading social network's rules, the US company said. [Read More]
A former government intelligence analyst has been charged with leaking classified documents about military campaigns against terrorist group al-Qaeda to a reporter. [Read More]
Freedom Mobile, Canada's fourth largest mobile network operator, leaked the details of many customers, including their contact information, date of birth, and payment card data. [Read More]
Experts called on 5G providers Friday to heed supply chain security in light of concerns about technology providers such as China's Huawei, recently banned by the US government. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Alastair Paterson's picture
With more legislation expected, every company should ensure they have a robust framework in place along with strong data mapping capabilities.
Torsten George's picture
By implementing the core pillars of GDPR, organizations can assure they meet the mandate’s requirements while strengthening their cyber security posture.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.