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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The EU's anti-trust regulator is to slap tech giant Google with a new fine over unfair competition practices, according to reports. [Read More]
Google said it took down 2.3 billion bad ads in 2018, including 58.8 million phishing ads. [Read More]
Chinese e-commerce giant Gearbest exposed user data through unprotected databases. The company has downplayed the incident and blamed it on an error made by a member of its security team. [Read More]
China will "never" ask its firms to spy on other nations, Premier Li Keqiang said Friday, amid US warnings that Chinese telecommunications behemoth Huawei poses security risks. [Read More]
The campaign of a former Israeli military chief who is a leading challenger to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in his tight race for re-election says the candidate has been targeted by an Iranian hacking attack. [Read More]
Security concerns about the role of Huawei in Western 5G telecom infrastructure are to be taken seriously, says head of NATO as Washington steps up pressure on Europe not to use the Chinese firm. [Read More]
AV-Comparatives has analyzed 250 antimalware Android applications offered on Google Play and found that many either fail to detect threats or they are simply fake. [Read More]
US prosecutors have launched a criminal investigation into Facebook's practice of sharing users' data with companies without letting the social network's members know, The New York Times reported. [Read More]
A critical crypto-related vulnerability that can be exploited to manipulate votes without being detected impacts e-voting systems in Switzerland and Australia. [Read More]
German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Tuesday Berlin would consult Washington over using technology made by China's Huawei in future mobile phone networks, following reports of US threats to reduce intelligence cooperation. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Torsten George's picture
By implementing the core pillars of GDPR, organizations can assure they meet the mandate’s requirements while strengthening their cyber security posture.
Preston Hogue's picture
You should be asking yourself what your digital vapor trail says about you and its potential impact on your own reputation and the trust others have in you.
Preston Hogue's picture
In the United States, it is consumers’ responsibility to opt out of sharing their information with the services they join—and figuring out how to do so.
Preston Hogue's picture
There have been so many high-profile breaches that a person’s entire life could be laid out, triangulated and, ultimately, faked by someone with the wrong set of intentions.
Laurence Pitt's picture
Failure to implement basic cybersecurity hygiene practices will leave retailers vulnerable to damage and fines during a lucrative time for their businesses.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Ashley Arbuckle interviews Michelle Dennedy, Cisco’s Chief Privacy Officer (CPO), to discuss how data privacy has a major impact on business.
Preston Hogue's picture
It’s a good reminder that communications in cyberspace can have a long shelf life that both individuals and organizations would be wise to consider.
Laurence Pitt's picture
ePrivacy takes GDPR's approach a step further by ensuring personal and family privacy in relation to data collection, storage and usage.
Justin Fier's picture
Over time, holding people responsible will lead individuals to see how their actions impact the security of the organization and come to consider themselves responsible for the security of the company.
Travis Greene's picture
While GDPR doesn’t require encryption, there are four mentions of encryption in GDPR that provide real incentives for organizations to use encryption.