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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

NEWS ANALYSIS: CrowdStrike said it will shell out a whopping $400 million to snap up a Splunk competitor and present itself as the security data lake for enterprise customers. We look at how the move affects the EDR, xDR and SIEM categories. [Read More]
Apple has published an updated Platform Security Guide, providing detailed technical explanations on the security features and technology implemented in its products. [Read More]
Researchers discovered potentially serious vulnerabilities in the popular file sharing app SHAREit, but it’s unclear if they have been patched. [Read More]
The surveillanceware, Hornbill and SunBird, targeted Pakistan military, nuclear authorities, and Indian election officials. [Read More]
The 30 analyzed apps expose sensitive data such as protected health information (PHI) and personally identifiable information (PII). [Read More]
Microsoft drops a mega patch batch for February: 56 documented vulnerabilities, 11 rated critical, one under active attack. [Read More]
Endpoint security firm SentinelOne expects the $155 million deal to buy Scalyr will speed up its push into the lucrative XDR (Extended Detection and Response) market. [Read More]
The switching and networking giant patches a wide range of high-severity security vulnerabilities in VPN routers and SD-WAN in the small business segment. [Read More]
The vulnerable Realtek module is used in embedded devices in industries such as automotive, healthcare, industrial, and security. [Read More]
Fixes for over 40 vulnerabilities were included in the Android security updates for February 2021. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.