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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A vulnerability dubbed 'StrandHogg' has been exploited by malicious Android apps and hundreds of popular applications are at risk of being targeted. [Read More]
Twitter and Facebook this week took action against malicious mobile software development kits (SDKs) that were used to improperly access user data. [Read More]
A recently discovered Android banking Trojan that features a narrow target list and two-step overlays is capable of stealing both login credentials and credit card data. [Read More]
Thousands of Android applications are still impacted by the GIF processing vulnerability that was patched recently in WhatsApp. [Read More]
U.S. communications regulators have cut off government funding for Chinese companies Huawei and ZTE, citing security threats. [Read More]
Google is expanding its Android bug bounty program and it has announced a top reward of $1.5 million for Pixel Titan M exploits. [Read More]
Critical vulnerabilities that have been patched years ago are still present in many popular Android applications due to developers’ failure to fix third-party component flaws. [Read More]
The Army's use of a China-owned video app called TikTok as part of a new campaign to recruit young people into the service is raising concerns on Capitol Hill. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities found in the Android camera apps provided by Google and Samsung could have been exploited by hackers to spy on users. [Read More]
WhatsApp vulnerability can be exploited for remote code execution and installing malicious apps via specially crafted MP4 files. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Seema Haji's picture
Enormous bandwidth increases of 5G, the rapid expansion of edge computing and countless new IoT devices introduce risk despite their intended benefit.
Laurence Pitt's picture
As we continue to increase our dependency on communications networks and technologies to move tremendous amounts of data, we open up greater potential for serious disaster should they be compromised.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.