Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Apple has addressed more than 30 other security holes in the mobile platform, including one that allowed malicious applications to gain root privileges. [Read More]
Microsoft is ready to offer up to $30,000 to researchers who discover vulnerabilities with high impact on customer privacy and security. [Read More]
The United Nations’ human rights chief voiced alarm Monday over the reported use of military-grade malware from Israel-based NSO Group to spy on journalists, human rights activists and political dissidents. [Read More]
Currently, the vulnerability can be exploited to crash the Wi-Fi functionality on any iPhone when connecting to an access point that has a specially crafted SSID. [Read More]
Reports that Israel-made Pegasus spyware has been used to monitor activists, journalists and politicians around the world highlight the diplomatic risks of nurturing and exporting "oppressive technology", experts warned. [Read More]
Israel's NSO Group has been linked to a list of 50,000 smartphone numbers, including those of activists, journalists, business executives and politicians around the world. [Read More]
The German software maker has released patches for a pair of high-severity Netweaver vulnerabilities. [Read More]
Mozilla has released Firefox 90 with several security improvements, including better protections against cross-origin threats, as well as an advanced tracker blocking mechanism. [Read More]
The System component was affected the most, receiving patches for 13 elevation of privilege and information disclosure bugs. [Read More]
Researchers have identified more than 170 Android apps that scam users interested in cryptocurrencies, which cannot even be classified as 'malware' since they do nothing typified as malicious and don't contain a payload. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.