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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Google has patched over 50 vulnerabilities in the Android operating system with the August 2020 security updates. [Read More]
Microsoft will continue talks to acquire the US operations of popular video-sharing app TikTok, after meeting with President Donald Trump who seemingly backed off his earlier threats to ban the Chinese-owned platform. [Read More]
President Donald Trump said he will bar fast-growing social media app TikTok from the United States as American authorities have raised concerns the service could be a tool for Chinese intelligence. [Read More]
The US ambassador in Brasilia warned of "consequences" if Brazil chooses Chinese telecoms company Huawei to develop its 5G network. [Read More]
ZDI has announced the rules and prizes for Pwn2Own Tokyo 2020, where white hat hackers can earn tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars for vulnerabilities in smartphones and IoT devices. [Read More]
Chinese drone maker DJI has responded to the disclosure of security issues found in its Android app, which researchers compared to malware behavior. [Read More]
Apple this week kicked off an initiative meant to improve iPhone security, by providing researchers with hackable phones. [Read More]
Facebook has announced new privacy and security features for Messenger, including App Lock and a new Privacy settings section. [Read More]
The failure of organizations in Israel’s water sector to secure cellular routers made it possible for hackers to launch a second round of attacks on the country’s water facilities. [Read More]
The speaker of the Catalan regional parliament demanded that the Spanish government launch an official investigation into reports that his cellphone was the target of espionage, allegedly by Spanish security services. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.