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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Amnesty International says its has independently confirmed that powerful spyware from the Israeli surveillance software maker NSO Group was used to hack Polish senator, Krzysztof Brejza, multiple times in 2019. [Read More]
Organizations can now deploy Microsoft Defender for Endpoint on iOS devices without user interaction. [Read More]
Researchers have shown how a piece of iOS malware can achieve “persistence” by faking the iPhone shutdown process via a technique dubbed “NoReboot.” [Read More]
Security patches were released for Android OS, Pixel devices, and Android Automotive OS. [Read More]
DuckDuckGo plans to ship a privacy-centric desktop browser built from scratch to compete with Google’s Chrome and Microsoft’s Edge. [Read More]
A long-term phishing experiment at a 56,000-employee company ends with a caution around the use of simulated phishing lures in corporate security awareness training exercises. [Read More]
Fresh off a high-profile legal triumph over Apple, Corellium gets major attention from investors with Paladin Capital Group leading a $25 million funding round. [Read More]
Adobe documented at least 60 security vulnerabilities in prominent software products and warned that malicious actors could exploit these bugs for code execution, privilege escalation and denial-of-service attacks. [Read More]
The iOS and macOS updates released this week by Apple patch vulnerabilities that earned researchers over $600,000 at a Chinese hacking contest. [Read More]
The new iOS 15.2 makeover fixes security vulnerabilities in multiple components, some serious enough to lead to code execution attacks if iPhone or iPad users open image or audio files. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Preston Hogue's picture
Telecom service providers need protections for everything from their back-end networks to cell towers to billions of devices in users’ hands.
John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.