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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The United States has indicted nine individuals with online identity theft and related charges in connection with SIM Swapping attacks. [Read More]
The latest Android iteration (Android Q) arrives with TLS 1.3 support enabled by default, as well as with other security improvements, Google announced this week. [Read More]
Samsung unveils Exynos i T100, a new chip designed to enhance the security and reliability of IoT devices that use short-range communication protocols, such as BLE and Zigbee. [Read More]
The May 2019 set of security patches released for the Android operating system address 8 Critical vulnerabilities, including 4 remote code execution flaws. [Read More]
Experts called on 5G providers Friday to heed supply chain security in light of concerns about technology providers such as China's Huawei, recently banned by the US government. [Read More]
The United States on Thursday urged "like-minded governments" from the European Union to be cautious and coordinate their policies on 5G network security in light of suspicions over the system proposed by Chinese giant Huawei. [Read More]
Chinese authorities are using a mobile app designed for mass surveillance to profile, investigate and detain Muslims in Xinjiang by labelling "completely lawful" behaviour as suspicious, a Human Rights Watch report said. [Read More]
Apple claims it recently removed several parental control applications from the App Store due to their use of “highly invasive” mobile device management (MDM) technology. [Read More]
British telecoms group Vodafone tackled a security flaw with Huawei technology a decade ago, it was revealed Tuesday amid widespread concerns over the Chinese giant developing 5G networks abroad. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities in the iLnkP2P implementation of P2P expose millions of cameras and other IoT devices to remote attacks from the Internet, and no patches are available. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.
Adam Ely's picture
The mobile strategist will play a pivotal role in mobile integration, as they pave the way for the organizations to do so purposefully and securely.