Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Proton Technologies, the company behind the privacy-focused email service ProtonMail, has made available the source code of its iOS client application. [Read More]
India demanded answers from WhatsApp over a snooping scandal Thursday after coming under fire from critics who accused authorities of using malware installed on the Facebook-owned messaging service to spy on citizens. [Read More]
Corellium, a virtualization company that creates perfect replicas of the iPhone and iOS for security research and testing purposes, has responded to Apple’s lawsuit. [Read More]
Apple patches 40 vulnerabilities in macOS Catalina and iOS 13, including flaws that affect both operating systems. [Read More]
Israeli spyware company NSO Group is accused by WhatsApp of cyberespionage targeting journalists, lawyers, human rights activists and others on the Facebook-owned messaging service. [Read More]
Tens of adware-carrying Android applications gathered 8 million installs on Google Play before being taken down. [Read More]
A total of 17 iOS applications infected with clicker Trojan malware made it into the Apple App Store. [Read More]
Recent Gustuff Android banking Trojan campaigns featured an updated malware version. [Read More]
Google has improved the Site Isolation feature in Chrome to help defend against more types of attacks. [Read More]
A security researcher has published a PoC exploit for the recently addressed Android zero-day vulnerability that impacts Pixel 2 devices. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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John Maddison's picture
There are three basic security components that every organization with an open BYOD strategy needs to be familiar with.
Laurence Pitt's picture
By paying just a bit more attention to the permissions you are allowing on your phone or computer, you could protect yourself from a much more significant headache down the road.
Alastair Paterson's picture
While less powerful than desktops and servers used for this purpose, more Android devices exist, and they are often less protected and, thus, more easily accessible.
Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.
Adam Ely's picture
The mobile strategist will play a pivotal role in mobile integration, as they pave the way for the organizations to do so purposefully and securely.