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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Social media platform Twitter has confirmed that attackers downloaded user data from some of the accounts compromised in last week’s security incident. [Read More]
Industry professionals comment on the recent Twitter hack and its potential impact and implications. [Read More]
Twitter says hackers targeted 130 accounts in the recent attack, but only managed to hijack some of them. [Read More]
Britain, the United States and Canada accused Russian hackers on Thursday of trying to steal information from researchers seeking a coronavirus vaccine, warning scientists and pharmaceutical companies to be alert for suspicious activity. [Read More]
A breach in Twitter’s security that allowed hackers to break into the accounts of leaders and technology moguls is one of the worst attacks in recent years and may shake trust in a platform politicians and CEOs use to communicate with the public. [Read More]
Twitter has confirmed that hackers leveraged internal tools to take over high-profile accounts and post scam tweets. [Read More]
Citrix denies claims that its systems have been breached and says the data being sold on the dark web actually comes from a third party. [Read More]
German authorities have seized a computer server that hosted a huge cache of files from scores of U.S. federal, state and local law enforcement agencies obtained in a Houston data breach last month. [Read More]
EDP Renewables North America has admitted that a recent cyberattack aimed at its parent company, which involved ransomware, also resulted in hackers accessing its own systems. [Read More]
The threat actor behind the Sodinokibi (REvil) ransomware is demanding a $14 million ransom from Brazilian-based electrical energy company Light S.A. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Incident Response

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Torsten George's picture
The anatomy of a hack has been glorified and led to the common belief that data breaches typically exploit zero-day vulnerabilities and require a tremendous amount of code sophistication.
Marc Solomon's picture
You need a way to ensure your threat hunting efforts are focused on high-risk threats and that the team is operating efficiently since time is the enemy.
Marc Solomon's picture
As a security professional, wouldn’t it be great to be able to focus on one thing at a time and know you’re focused on the right things to protect the organization?
Marc Solomon's picture
Most organizations have more intelligence than they know what to do with. What’s lacking is a way to aggregate all this data in one manageable location where it can be translated into a uniform format for analysis and action.
Jalal Bouhdada's picture
In the event of a cybersecurity incident in an industrial environment, you should follow a well-established seven step response process.
Marc Solomon's picture
How do we break this wasteful cycle and enable teams and technologies to reduce instances of false positives? The answer lies in prioritization and learning.
Stan Engelbrecht's picture
By highlighting phishing, which causes so many headaches for all us security professionals, you can see just how much of a game-changer automation can be for any SOC or CSIRT.
Marc Solomon's picture
Adversaries are increasingly masterful at taking advantage of these seams between technologies and teams to infiltrate organizations and remain below the radar.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
There’s no point in having billions of data points if those data points aren’t timely, accurate, actionable, and adequately map to your intelligence objectives and requirements.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Like dog bites, the negative impact of cyber incidents can go from bad to worse quickly—and the first 48 hours are critical.