Security Experts:

Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The County of Tehama, California, informs employees, recipients of services, and affiliates of data breach. [Read More]
Attorneys general in more than 30 US states have urged the FTC to take into consideration the consumer harms associated with online surveillance and data security practices. [Read More]
Microsoft has observed a threat actor tracked as DEV-0569 updating its delivery methods and distributing the Royal ransomware. [Read More]
A Ukrainian hacker sought by US authorities for a decade was arrested last month in Switzerland, according to reports. [Read More]
A critical vulnerability affecting Omron products has been exploited by a sophisticated piece of malware designed to target industrial control systems (ICS). [Read More]
The Hive ransomware gang has victimized more than 1,300 businesses, receiving over $100 million in ransom payments. [Read More]
The cybersecurity powerhouse plans to spend $195 million in cash to acquire Israeli application security startup Cider Security. [Read More]
Google has won its lawsuit against operators of the Glupteba botnet, which the internet giant disrupted last year. [Read More]
A threat actor has infected hundreds of victims in an ongoing supply chain attack relying on malicious Python packages. [Read More]
Sansec warns of a surge in TrojanOrder attacks targeting Magento and Adobe Commerce stores that have not been patched against CVE-2022-24086. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Jeff Orloff's picture
Most organizations rely too heavily on their cybersecurity pros to protect them from threats, ignoring the painful reality that human error is by far the most common cause of security breaches.
Derek Manky's picture
Botnets are becoming more malicious, sometimes able to create hundreds of thousands of drones that can attack a variety of machines, including Mac systems, Linux, Windows systems, edge devices, IoT devices, and so on.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Despite having different infrastructure, goals and methods, threat actors do not work in a vacuum. They feed off of each other.
Derek Manky's picture
How can organizations fight ransomware? The best solution is always prevention. Here are three tactics toward that goal.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
The question of the importance of the state of a client device is a debate that has been around for a few years in the security field.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Plausible deniability provides a massive operational leeway to military operations in cyberspace, enabling governments to take actions without risking an all-out war.
Keith Ibarguen's picture
Leveraging humans for detection makes it hard for the attackers to predict whether or not their malicious emails will be identified and using technology to automate response provides scale and speed in resolution.
Idan Aharoni's picture
The fact that so many large and high-profile enterprises fall prey to ransomware attacks that in many cases does not pose any new technical challenge suggests that there are still many gaps that needs to be closed.
Derek Manky's picture
We tend to focus on the attack surface when it comes to cybersecurity, but the reality is, much like an iceberg, there’s so much more lurking beneath the surface.
Gordon Lawson's picture
Threat hunting must be non-attributable, while maintaining a clear audit trail to satisfy legal and governance requirements.