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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

European authorities say they have dismantled the “InfinityBlack” cybercrime group after arresting several individuals in Poland and Switzerland. [Read More]
Cybercriminals are taking advantage of the pandemic, including hackers who target hospitals and medical research institutions that are studying the coronavirus, said the head of the FBI’s cyber division. [Read More]
Twitter will not be allowed to disclose more information on national security requests after the U.S. government convinced a judge that the disclosure of such information could harm national security. [Read More]
Threat actors working for North Korea have also been hired by others to hack websites and extort targets, the US government says in a new cyber alert. [Read More]
Dutch police on Friday arrested a 19-year-old man from Breda suspected of launching a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on a government website. [Read More]
Google and Apple are developing a coronavirus smartphone "contact tracing" tool that could potentially alert people when they have crossed paths with an infected person. [Read More]
The Justice Department inspector general has found additional failures in the FBI’s handling of a secretive surveillance program that came under scrutiny after the Russia investigation. [Read More]
A malicious campaign is targeting organizations from a broad range of industries with a piece of malware known as Kwampirs, FBI warns. [Read More]
The financially-motivated hacking group FIN7 has started mailing malicious USB devices to intended victims to infect them with malware, the FBI warns. [Read More]
The majority of campaign websites of United States presidential candidates run code that can pose security and privacy risks to consumers. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.
John Vecchi's picture
Understanding the various types of malicious actors targeting your networks, including their motivations and modus operandi, is key to identifying, expelling and expunging them.
Gant Redmon's picture
When it comes to cybercrime, the police really can’t and aren’t going to protect residents of your town. The same goes for all towns and cities. Unless you’re talking a high six-figure theft, it's unlikely an officer will be assigned to your case.
Rod Rasmussen's picture
In this second column in a two part series, Rod tackles the impact of the DNSChanger malware and simple solutions to counter similar DNS attacks on enterprises and major government agencies.
Chris Poulin's picture
To effectively defend yourself against an enemy, you have to think like your adversary. Put yourself in their mind, their shoes. What’s the motive? How determined are they? Will they stop at a well-hardened network perimeter or move on to other tactics, including social engineering? Once you suffer a breach, how do you share your analysis?
Idan Aharoni's picture
The worlds of counter terrorism and fraud prevention should increase their ties. Systems that are already implemented in one world may be applied to the other. Solution providers and policy makers from both worlds need to meet up and share ideas, thoughts and experience for the benefit of both.
Noa Bar-Yosef's picture
This week, we highlight a mix of tools and tool types that security researchers should have in their weapons in arsenal, including tools unveiled for the first time at the Black Hat conference.
Michael Goff's picture
Once a Software Vendor discovers that their software has been pirated, the gut reaction is to put an immediate stop to it. If piracy is discovered, it’s best to react, but don’t overreact. Be proactive, yet patient.