Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Allegations that governments used phone malware supplied by an Israeli firm to spy on journalists, activists and heads of state have "exposed a global human rights crisis," Amnesty International said, asking for a moratorium on the sale and use of surveillance technology. [Read More]
The 24-year-old and a 15-year-old accomplice created and sold phishing frameworks targeting the users of Dutch and Belgian banks. [Read More]
A British man has been charged in the United States in connection with a Twitter hack last summer that compromised the accounts of prominent politicians, celebrities and technology moguls, the Justice Department said. [Read More]
French President Emmanuel Macron leads a list of 14 current or former heads of state who may have been targeted for hacking by clients of the notorious Israeli spyware firm NSO Group, Amnesty International said Tuesday. [Read More]
Russian hacker Peter Levashov, known internationally as the “bot master”, was sentenced to the 33 months he has already served in custody on federal charges he operated the notorious Kelihos botnet. [Read More]
The United Nations’ human rights chief voiced alarm Monday over the reported use of military-grade malware from Israel-based NSO Group to spy on journalists, human rights activists and political dissidents. [Read More]
Here’s what you need to know about a new report on NSO Group, the notorious Israeli hacker-for-hire company and maker of Pegasus malware. [Read More]
Reports that Israel-made Pegasus spyware has been used to monitor activists, journalists and politicians around the world highlight the diplomatic risks of nurturing and exporting "oppressive technology", experts warned. [Read More]
The United States and its allies have officially accused China of being behind the Microsoft Exchange attacks disclosed in early March. [Read More]
Israel's NSO Group has been linked to a list of 50,000 smartphone numbers, including those of activists, journalists, business executives and politicians around the world. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

rss icon

Gordon Lawson's picture
Threat hunting must be non-attributable, while maintaining a clear audit trail to satisfy legal and governance requirements.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Taking down dark web sites may cause headache for both the bad guys and the good guys, but it can also have a profound positive effect on the fight against cybercrime.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Wade Williamson's picture
Asking for security backdoors that only benefit the good guys is like asking for bullets that only hurt the bad guys. That’s simply not how encryption works.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.