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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

IcedID banking trojan operators send messages using contact forms in an attempt to trick victims into downloading malicious attachments. [Read More]
Security startup Randori releases Target Temptation to help pinpoint the ‘attackability’ of the assets in an enterprise network. [Read More]
Microsoft's new 'CyberBattleSim' research toolkit supports the high-level abstract simulation of computer networks and cybersecurity concepts. [Read More]
The new 'Aviary' dashboard will help visualize and analyze output from Sparrow, a CISA-developed tool for detecting potentially malicious activity in Microsoft Azure and Microsoft 365 environments. [Read More]
Threat actors are abusing organizations’ reliance on communication services such as Discord and Slack to circumvent network protections and ensure effectiveness of attacks. [Read More]
Cisco patches a critical vulnerability in an SD-WAN software product but warned that a different high-risk bug in end-of-life small business routers will remain unpatched. [Read More]
Cring ransomware operators exploit an old vulnerability in the FortiOS SSL VPN web portal to access enterprise networks, including the ones of industrial organisations. [Read More]
Proofpoint warns that attackers are leveraging compromised supplier accounts and supplier impersonation to send malware, steal credentials and perpetrate invoicing fraud. [Read More]
Researchers have discovered FlixOnline, new Android malware that uses Netflix as its lure and spreads malware via auto-replies to WhatsApp messages. [Read More]
A joint report from SAP and Onapsis warns that advanced threat actors are targeting new vulnerabilities in SAP applications within days after the availability of security patches. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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Derek Manky's picture
Each side of the public-private collaboration has resources and capabilities that shore up the other and increase effectiveness in combatting cybercrime.
Tim Bandos's picture
The ransomware threat could still become more pervasive over the next two to three years, not because ransomware is effective in and of itself but because of other players in the game continue to fan the flames.
Derek Manky's picture
2020 has taught us to revisit the practice of inspecting encrypted traffic. These are all standard security protocols to step up in light of what cybercriminals are doing now.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
Playing whack-a-mole with malicious code infections, phishing sites, and compromised credentials won’t help an enterprise reduce losses due to fraud.
Torsten George's picture
Ransomware is just one of many tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) that threat actors are using to attack organizations by compromising remote user devices.
John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.
Justin Fier's picture
The origin story of Mimikatz — a post-exploitation module that has enabled criminals to steal millions of passwords around the world — reads like an over-the-top spy thriller.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”