Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

An updated version of the ComRAT malware that Russia-linked cyber-espionage threat actor Turla has been using in recent attacks can connect to Gmail to receive commands. [Read More]
Silent Night is a new sophisticated and heavily obfuscated Zloader/Zbot, ZeuS-derived banking trojan with an improved modular design over previous ZeuS derivatives. [Read More]
The Ragnar Locker ransomware has been deploying a full virtual machine to ensure that it can evade detection. [Read More]
Industry professionals comment on the findings in Verizon’s 2020 Data Breach Investigation Report (DBIR). [Read More]
Malicious actors targeting a zero-day vulnerability in Sophos XG Firewall appliances last month attempted to deploy ransomware after Sophos started taking measures to neutralize the attack. [Read More]
Researchers have spotted a WordPress malware that allows cybercriminals to collect information from WooCommerce stores and helps them set up compromised websites for future skimming attacks. [Read More]
New variants of the Mirai and Hoaxcalls botnets have been targeting an old remote code execution vulnerability in legacy Symantec Secure Web Gateway versions. [Read More]
Australian steel maker BlueScope disclosed a “cyber incident” last week that was initially detected at one of its US businesses. [Read More]
Texas’ transportation agency has become the second part of the state government to be hit by a ransomware attack in recent days. [Read More]
Several supercomputers across Europe were taken offline last week after being targeted in what appears to be a crypto-mining campaign. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

rss icon

John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.
Justin Fier's picture
The origin story of Mimikatz — a post-exploitation module that has enabled criminals to steal millions of passwords around the world — reads like an over-the-top spy thriller.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
Historical patterns and recent activity indicate that another major Necurs malware outbreak is looming just around the corner.