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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

New Mexico school districts, universities, and government agencies have collectively spent millions of dollars to regain control of their computer systems after being hit by ransomware. [Read More]
UK financial technology company Finastra has disclosed a data breach that may involve ransomware. [Read More]
A new Mirai variant named Mukashi has been delivered to Zyxel NAS devices via exploitation of a recently patched vulnerability tracked as CVE-2020-9054. [Read More]
In a campaign targeting German companies, the infamous Russia-linked threat actor known as TA505 has been using legitimate tools in addition to malware. [Read More]
Amid numerous malicious attacks leveraging the current COVID-19 coronavirus crisis, security researchers have discovered an Android surveillance campaign targeting users in Libya. [Read More]
A recently discovered TrickBot variant targeting telecommunications organizations in the United States and Hong Kong includes a module for RDP brute-forcing. [Read More]
The coronavirus pandemic has spawned a coronavirus malware epidemic, where everyone and every organization is a potential target. [Read More]
Most ransomware is deployed after hours, and usually several days after the initial compromise, newly published research from FireEye reveals. [Read More]
It may look like an email from a supervisor with an attachment on the new "work from home policy." But it could be a cleverly designed scheme to hack into your network. [Read More]
A piece of Android stalkerware called MonitorMinor has a far wider range of functions than other threats of this type, allowing attackers to steal data and control devices. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.
Justin Fier's picture
The origin story of Mimikatz — a post-exploitation module that has enabled criminals to steal millions of passwords around the world — reads like an over-the-top spy thriller.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
Historical patterns and recent activity indicate that another major Necurs malware outbreak is looming just around the corner.