Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The FBI is expecting an increase in the frequency of scams related to the current COVID-19 pandemic, including those involving BEC attacks. [Read More]
The Nigerian business email compromise (BEC) threat actors referred to as SilverTerrier have intensified assaults on multiple industries and should be considered an established threat. [Read More]
A new feature that Microsoft is adding to its Edge browser will alert users if the passwords saved to autofill have been compromised. [Read More]
The official website of kitchen products maker Tupperware was hacked and the attackers planted malicious code designed to steal visitors’ payment card information. [Read More]
The FBI shut down a Russian-based online platform where various cybercrime products and services were being sold. [Read More]
San Francisco, Calif-based Arkose Labs has raised $22 million in a Series B funding round led by the Microsoft venture fund, M12. [Read More]
Four major wireless U.S. carriers are developing a new single sign-on variant they believe will finally do away with passwords. [Read More]
It may look like an email from a supervisor with an attachment on the new "work from home policy." But it could be a cleverly designed scheme to hack into your network. [Read More]
Twenty-four individuals were arrested for laundering funds illegally obtained via business email compromise (BEC), romance, and retirement account scams targeting victims across the United States. [Read More]
European authorities managed to crack down on two cybercrime gangs responsible for stealing millions by employing SIM hijacking. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Fraud & Identity Theft

rss icon

Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.
Gant Redmon's picture
When it comes to cybercrime, the police really can’t and aren’t going to protect residents of your town. The same goes for all towns and cities. Unless you’re talking a high six-figure theft, it's unlikely an officer will be assigned to your case.
Gant Redmon's picture
The holiday season is a time of giving. But savvy security and technology professionals such as yourselves know, both during the holidays and year-round, that not all giving is good.
Alan Wlasuk's picture
No more fertile ground for security breaches exists in the United States than our colleges and universities. A higher education student database is an identity thief’s dream come true.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Cooperation in the underground economy could enable a fraudster in Russia who masters the art of phishing to team up with another fraudster who already has the infrastructure of cashing out compromised online banking accounts of US banks.
Noa Bar-Yosef's picture
Companies are increasingly seeing the benefits of using social technologies both for internal and external purposes. What is the security impact of this trend? What should security teams think about?
Idan Aharoni's picture
To maximize profits, fraudsters need to do a lot of learning. They can either learn techniques of areas they haven't focused on yet, learn better techniques in the field they already specialize in, or learn new cover stories to improve the techniques they already use.
Idan Aharoni's picture
The worlds of counter terrorism and fraud prevention should increase their ties. Systems that are already implemented in one world may be applied to the other. Solution providers and policy makers from both worlds need to meet up and share ideas, thoughts and experience for the benefit of both.
Idan Aharoni's picture
A bank that will fail to give fraud departments the power to make the necessary changes to its internal processes, may end up in a situation where everyone knows how and why fraudsters are stealing money from their bank – yet nothing can be done to stop it.
Robert Vamosi's picture
Some newer POS systems in the US have built-in authentication systems designed to protect merchants against the addition of fraudulent PIN pads. Should PCI now require retail businesses to upgrade to newer and better technology?