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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A cyber espionage group named GreyEnergy, linked by researchers to Russia's BlackEnergy, has been targeting energy and transportation companies in Ukraine and other countries [Read More]
The Illinois Board of Elections hired three cybersecurity experts to watch elections and voter-data systems for irregularities. [Read More]
A newly discovered infection campaign is leveraging malicious RTF files to deliver information-stealing Trojans without being detected [Read More]
A Russia-linked threat group tracked as DustSquad and Nomadic Octopus has been targeting diplomatic entities in Central Asia [Read More]
Federal and state officials are working with Onslow Water and Sewer Authority after hackers attacked some of its computer systems. [Read More]
Apple, Cisco, Mozilla, Kaspersky and others are concerned about Australia's encryption laws, despite the government specifically claiming it will not weaken encryption [Read More]
A former NASA contractor who allegedly threatened to publish nude photos of seven women unless they sent him other explicit pictures has pleaded guilty to federal charges. [Read More]
Cybersecurity agencies in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand release joint report on publicly available hacking tools [Read More]
Facebook on Thursday said it shut down 251 accounts for breaking rules against spam and coordinated deceit, some of it by ad farms pretending to be forums for political debate. [Read More]
Hackers exploit the Drupal vulnerability known as Drupalgeddon2 to install a backdoor on compromised servers [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Siggi Stefnisson's picture
If I have one wish for ‘Cybersecurity Awareness Month,’ it’s that we all need to be aware of the need for innovative responses on the part of the security industry, to counter a threat industry which is innovating both technical and business models at a rapid pace.
Devon Kerr's picture
If phishing attacks slip past the first line of defense, security teams need to be able to identify suspicious activity and stop it before hackers can learn enough about their enterprise to execute a full attack.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Studying the DNC Hacker case shows just how difficult it is to maintain a false identity in the face of a highly resourced and motivated opponent.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Actively investigating and infiltrating criminal groups online is not “hacking back,” but it may provoke that as a response.
Alastair Paterson's picture
Malicious actors have been experimenting with a blockchain domain name system (DNS) as a way of hiding their malicious activity and bullet-proofing their offerings.
Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Laurence Pitt's picture
While awareness is key and technology is a great assistant, there is one simple practice we can all adopt: think before you click or share.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”