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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Burlington, North Carolina-based LabCorp took some of its systems offline last weekend after discovering that some had been infected by ransomware. [Read More]
Flashpoint announces new service designed to help organizations respond and prepare for ransomware and other cyber extortion incidents [Read More]
Cryptominers have plateaued, GandCrab is the new king of ransomware, adware -- surprise! -- is as prolific as ever, and VPNFilter might herald a new genre of sophisticated multi-purpose malware. [Read More]
An ongoing espionage campaign aimed at Ukraine is leveraging three different remote access Trojans (RATs), ESET security researchers warn. [Read More]
President Donald Trump found himself isolated and under pressure to reverse course after publicly challenging the US intelligence conclusion that Russia meddled in the 2016 election during his face-to-face with Vladimir Putin. [Read More]
Colton Ray Grubbs of Kentucky admitted in a U.S. court to developing and distributing the LuminosityLink remote access Trojan. [Read More]
Blackgear cyberespionage campaign, known to target Taiwan, South Korea and Japan, resurfaces with improved malware that abuses social media sites (including Facebook) for C&C communications [Read More]
Confirming a trend noted by other researchers, a new report from network security firm Cryptonite notes that ransomware incidents have declined over the last six months. [Read More]
Now Ziv Mador, VP of security research at Trustwave, has given SecurityWeek details of a well-organized charitable element found in numerous deep web forums. [Read More]
A 30-year-old Irish man accused of working for now defunct "dark web" marketplace Silk Road has been extradited to the United States to face charges in New York, four years after his arrest, prosecutors announced Friday [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Lance Cottrell's picture
Even while using Tor hidden services, there are still many ways you can be exposed and have your activities compromised if you don’t take the right precautions.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Laurence Pitt's picture
While awareness is key and technology is a great assistant, there is one simple practice we can all adopt: think before you click or share.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Alastair Paterson's picture
By closely following trends watching for new activities and actors across a variety of data sources, security professionals can continue to take steps to mitigate the digital risk to their enterprises, partners and customers.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
Galina Antova's picture
We must recognize industrial cyberattacks as tactics in a new form of “economic warfare” being waged between nation-states to gain economic and political advantage without having to pay the price of open combat.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.