Security Experts:

Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Major ICS vendors and other organizations have been targeted in an ongoing cyberespionage campaign that appears to focus on renewable energy. [Read More]
NATO has inked a deal to bolster its cyber support for Ukraine, after a sweeping hacking attack against Kyiv heightened tensions amid fears that Russia could be plotting an invasion. [Read More]
Healthcare providers Caring Communities and Entira Family Clinics are warning patients that their personal information may have been exposed in a data breach that hit tech vendor Netgain Technology more than a year ago. [Read More]
Goodwill is informing customers that their personal contact information was compromised as a result of a website hack. [Read More]
Newly detected WhisperGate malware being used by previously unknown threat group in cyberattacks against Ukraine [Read More]
A Moscow court remanded eight hackers in custody for two months as Russia cracks down on the REvil cybercrime group at the request of the United States [Read More]
But Microsoft warned that the cyberattack on Ukraine could prove destructive and affect more organizations than initially feared. [Read More]
While it is not immediately clear who was behind cyberattacks on Ukraine, they come amid heightened tensions with Russia and after talks between Moscow and the West failed to yield any significant progress this week. [Read More]
Security researchers document vulnerabilities in AWS CloudFormation and AWS Glue that could be abused to leak sensitive files and access other customer’s data. [Read More]
Researchers estimate that North Korea-linked hacking group Lazarus pilfered close to $400 million in crypto-coins last year. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Derek Manky's picture
While the sky just may be the limit (or actually, it may not be), when it comes to cybercriminals, three key areas where we expect to see more activity in the coming year are space, digital wallets and esports.
Derek Manky's picture
Public and private entities need to collaborate by sharing threat information and attack data to make attacks more difficult and resource-intensive for cybercriminals.
Jeff Orloff's picture
Most organizations rely too heavily on their cybersecurity pros to protect them from threats, ignoring the painful reality that human error is by far the most common cause of security breaches.
Derek Manky's picture
Botnets are becoming more malicious, sometimes able to create hundreds of thousands of drones that can attack a variety of machines, including Mac systems, Linux, Windows systems, edge devices, IoT devices, and so on.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Despite having different infrastructure, goals and methods, threat actors do not work in a vacuum. They feed off of each other.
Derek Manky's picture
How can organizations fight ransomware? The best solution is always prevention. Here are three tactics toward that goal.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
The question of the importance of the state of a client device is a debate that has been around for a few years in the security field.
Idan Aharoni's picture
Plausible deniability provides a massive operational leeway to military operations in cyberspace, enabling governments to take actions without risking an all-out war.
Keith Ibarguen's picture
Leveraging humans for detection makes it hard for the attackers to predict whether or not their malicious emails will be identified and using technology to automate response provides scale and speed in resolution.
Idan Aharoni's picture
The fact that so many large and high-profile enterprises fall prey to ransomware attacks that in many cases does not pose any new technical challenge suggests that there are still many gaps that needs to be closed.