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WannaCry Does Not Fit North Korea's Style, Interests: Experts

Some experts believe that, despite malware code similarities, the WannaCry ransomware is unlikely to be the work of North Korea, as the attack does not fit the country’s style and interests.

The WannaCry ransomware, also known as Wanna Decryptor, WanaCrypt0r, WannaCrypt, Wana Decrypt0r and WCry, has hit hundreds of thousands of systems worldwide, including ones housed by banks, hospitals, ISPs, government agencies, transportation companies and manufacturing plants.

The first clue that the WannaCry ransomware may have been created by North Korea was uncovered by Google researcher Neel Mehta. The expert noticed that a variant of WannaCry making the rounds in February, when the threat was less known, had code similarities with a tool used by the North Korea-linked cyber espionage group named Lazarus. The code in question was removed from later versions of the ransomware.

Security firms such as Symantec and Kaspersky confirmed the connection to Lazarus, and Kaspersky said it was “improbable” that this was a false flag. Even the Shadow Brokers, the group that leaked the Equation Group exploits leveraged by WannaCry, attributed the attack to North Korea.

However, not everyone agrees that North Korea is behind WannaCry. The threat intelligence team at endpoint security firm Cybereason believes North Korea is unlikely to be behind the campaign.

“Nothing in North Korea’s past cyber campaigns or in their conventional military and foreign policy fit this mold. Looking at national identity, foreign policy and strategic messaging will greatly reduce the likelihood that Pyongyang ordered this campaign,” the company said in a blog post on Friday.

Related: Industry Reactions to WannaCry Ransomware Attacks

One reason is that North Korea, guided by its self-reliance ideology, has never used commodity malware or generic tools in its cyberattacks. All the tools and exploits leveraged by the Lazarus group have been custom-built, Cybereason said.

Another reason for which North Korea is unlikely to be behind the WannaCry ransomware attack is the fact that China and Russia, two of the country’s biggest allies, were among the most affected. Furthermore, some of Pyongyang’s biggest enemies, including the U.S., Japan and South Korea, had fairly low infection rates.

The Lazarus group has been linked to several high-profile operations, including the 2014 attack on Sony Pictures, the 2016 attack on Bangladesh’s central bank, which resulted in the theft of $81 million, and some more recent campaigns targeting financial institutions. While North Korea has never officially taken responsibility for these attacks, Cybereason pointed out that the country has always left clear hints of its involvement as a way of sending a strategic message.

Since Lazarus has been linked to several profit-driven attacks, there is a possibility that the WannaCry attacks had a similar goal. However, experts believe that if North Korea was behind the campaign and the goal was to make money, it would have likely set up a better payment system, it wouldn’t have bothered removing the Lazarus code from the final version of WannaCry, and it wouldn’t have neglected to register the kill switch domain that allowed researchers to disrupt the campaign.

Cybereason is not the only company that is skeptical of North Korea’s involvement in the WannaCry attack. Bogdan Botezatu, senior e-threat specialist at Bitdefender, also believes that the scenario in which a state-sponsored actor – especially one as sophisticated as Lazarus – would switch to ransomware is unlikely.

“The attack wasn't targeted and there was no clear gain for them,” Botezatu told SecurityWeek. “It's doubtful they would use such a powerful exploit for anything else than espionage.”

The expert pointed out that Bitdefender took WannaCry apart and found only the worm module and the ransomware component – nothing to indicate that the malware could be used for anything else.

Related: Medical Devices Infected With WannaCry Ransomware

Related: Industrial Systems at Risk of WannaCry Ransomware Attacks

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Eduard Kovacs is an international correspondent for SecurityWeek. He worked as a high school IT teacher for two years before starting a career in journalism as Softpedia’s security news reporter. Eduard holds a bachelor’s degree in industrial informatics and a master’s degree in computer techniques applied in electrical engineering.