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Virus & Threats
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

It takes SCADA vendors 150 days to patch vulnerabilities, and the industry is roughly at the same level as the cybersecurity sector [Read More]
Russian authorities dismantle cybercrime gang responsible for infecting 1 million Android phones with a banking Trojan and stealing nearly $900,000 [Read More]
ImageMagick, an open source command line graphics file editor, has been retired by one of its major consumers: Yahoo. [Read More]
Several critical DoS vulnerabilities patched in Asterisk, the open source communications framework used by over one million systems [Read More]
EternalRocks is the first known malware incorporating seven NSA hacking tools to compromise systems and install a secret backdoor. [Read More]
Verizon Messages was affected by a flaw that could have been exploited to launch XSS attacks over SMS [Read More]
Most of the computers affected by the WannaCry ransomware outbreak were running Windows 7, security researchers have revealed. [Read More]
VMware releases updates for Windows and Linux versions of Workstation to address privilege escalation and DoS vulnerabilities [Read More]
WikiLeaks detailed Athena, a malware developed by the CIA with a U.S. offensive-driven cybersecurity firm. The tool works on all versions of Windows [Read More]
Some experts believe the WannaCry ransomware attacks don’t fit North Korea’s style and interests, despite malware code similarities [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Threats

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Jim Ivers's picture
Many of you understand that addressing the vulnerabilities in your software is something you can no longer ignore, and are ready to get serious about software security.
Jim Ivers's picture
If your target is a connected toy, there is a new angle to consider: how secure is that toy? Is the connectivity of the toy potentially exposing personal data about your child?
David Holmes's picture
Many can figure out how to hack Smart-city services using simple techniques like replay to get free services or, in some cases, make a little bit of money.
Torsten George's picture
Faced with hundreds, thousands, and even hundreds of thousands of vulnerabilities across their IT infrastructures leaves security practitioners at a virtually insurmountable disadvantage.
Jim Ivers's picture
As with any business relationship, you should use software or open source components from your allies with your eyes open to the potential risks.
Erin O’Malley's picture
What’s worse than having to cook a Thanksgiving turkey? How about being forced to relegate the poor bird to a crock pot after discovering that your net-connected oven and wireless meat thermometer have both been hacked?
Alastair Paterson's picture
Understanding what makes a good exploit kit is the first step in protecting against such attacks. But what else can you do to prevent adversaries from using exploit kits against your organization?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
The interests of the researchers should be to make the world more secure, not profit from a corporation’s vulnerabilities.
Scott Gainey's picture
There’s a difference between “nice-to-have” security products and “must-have” security products. The “must-haves” are critical to protecting organizations from cyber attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
I know I no longer have much trust in the connected devices in my home, and wonder what they do with their spare time.