Security Experts:

Virus & Malware
long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

WikiLeaks releases details on Brutal Kangaroo, a tool suite used by the CIA to infect air-gapped networks with malware via thumb drives [Read More]
Cisco Talos releases BASS, an open source framework for automatically generating malware signatures [Read More]
U.S. fashion retailer Buckle informs customers that malware was present on PoS systems for nearly six months [Read More]
Industry professionals comment on the CrashOverride/Industroyer malware used in the December 2016 Ukraine power grid attack [Read More]
Industrial companies around the world targeted in phishing attacks believed to be originating in Nigeria [Read More]
Researchers spotted a new cyber espionage campaign involving Kasperagent malware. Targets unclear, but Palestine-themed documents used as decoy [Read More]
Six people arrested and dozens interviewed in international law enforcement operation targeting users of tools designed to help malware evade detection [Read More]
US-CERT has issued an alert to warn organizations of North Korea’s Hidden Cobra activity, particularly one of its DDoS botnets [Read More]
Latvian national Peteris Sahurovs extradited to the US for his role in a scareware operation that caused losses of millions of dollars [Read More]
CRASHOVERRIDE/Industroyer, the fourth known ICS malware, was used in the Ukraine energy attacks and it’s designed to specifically target electric grids [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Malware

rss icon

Zeus 2.1 now boasts features that help it avoid analysis and hostile takeover from law enforcement, researchers, or competing cybercriminal organizations.
David Harley's picture
David Harley chimes in with some thoughts on the latest developments from the AMTSO and the Anti-Malware Industry.
David Harley's picture
The vulnerability in Windows Shell’s parsing of .LNK (shortcut) files presents some interesting and novel features in terms of its media lifecycle as well as its evolution from zero-day to patched vulnerability. For most of us, the vulnerability first came to light in the context of Win32/Stuxnet, malware that in itself presents some notable quirks.
David Harley's picture
The anti-malware industry sometimes sees more complicated problems than you might imagine, and they can’t all be fixed by tweaking detection algorithms or giving the marketing team a productivity bonus.
Mike Lennon's picture
Malvertising - Popular websites, blogs, and ad networks are fast becoming the preferred means of cybercriminals, identity thieves, and hackers to steal consumer information and distribute malicious content.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Anti-virus products scan for malware in two ways. They look for sequences of bits that are found in programs that are known to be “evil” (but which are not commonly found in “good” programs)...