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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

WikiLeaks has published more documents detailing Windows attack tools allegedly used by the CIA [Read More]
Google researchers find remote code execution vulnerability in Windows. Flaw described as “worst,” “crazy bad” and “wormable” [Read More]
A critical escalation of privilege vulnerability affecting Intel Active Management Technology (AMT) could allow an unprivileged network attacker to gain system privileges. [Read More]
New malware able to spy on OSX users' internet traffic, including https traffic, has been found targeting European users. [Read More]
Critical command execution/privilege escalation vulnerability found in display software shipped with millions of devices [Read More]
An update released by Webroot caused the company’s antivirus to detect legitimate files as W32.Trojan.Gen [Read More]
Google hopes that by sharing its own experiences in developing and deploying tiered access, IT and security admins will feel empowered to develop a flexible and powerful access control system that better suits today's business. [Read More]
Cylance claims that the majority of independent third-party tests are biased in favor of the incumbent vendors that use malware signature databases (as well as other techniques, including their own use of machine learning). [Read More]
Kaspersky extends bug bounty program - adds Password Manager to scope and increases maximum reward to $5,000 [Read More]
USB Canary is a new open source tool that allows Linux users to receive an alert any time someone attempts to plug a device into a machine’s USB port. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Endpoint Security

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Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Was the Mayan Apocalypse was a myth? Since I am a security geek, I just happen to talk about security a lot. What are some security myths I have heard in my conversations with some very bright people?
Shaun Donaldson's picture
Virtualized end-user systems and public cloud computing will play a role in nearly every business over the next decade, but applying the disposable philosophy universally in an enterprise environment is beyond risky, when you consider how attacks have changed.
Alan Wlasuk's picture
I made a mistake the other day, a horrible mistake. I let my kid use my computer. My once perfect computer now has a life of its own, a malware bot that nests firmly in a place that I can’t see.
Michael Goff's picture
About 50 percent of all software piracy violations found at corporations happen from businesses that are already clients of the software they are accused of stealing. So, what steps should both the software vendor and their customers take to ensure the relationship avoids speed bumps such as software piracy?
Alan Wlasuk's picture
While our attention is immediately drawn to the Internet when we think about the benign-turned-evil Matrix, a more interesting comparison can be made to the current Internet plague of botnets.
Robert Vamosi's picture
Laptop batteries use microcontrollers to tell the lithium battery when it's full and when it needs to be recharged. What's intriguing is that cybercriminals could install malware that would remain on the device no matter how many times you reinstalled the operating system.
Andrew Jaquith's picture
As with most stories Mac-related, the malware-is-finally-coming story attracted a lot of press. But the desktop Mac OS might not be attractive to attackers as you might think.
Noa Bar-Yosef's picture
Are major data breach headlines helping consumers become more secure? Not necessarily. Many users still ignore security advisories, and our lackadaisical approach to security affects other consumers.
Mike Lennon's picture
Enjoy this selection of top picks for 2010, listed in no particular order. Happy New Year!
Ram Mohan's picture
Are your passwords safe? Three simple ways to create memorable yet secure passwords