Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Firefox will soon provide users with increased privacy by blocking browser fingerprinting performed through the HTML5 canvas element. [Read More]
Apple will let you unlock the iPhone X with your face -- a move likely to bring facial recognition to the masses, along with concerns over how the technology may be used for nefarious purposes. [Read More]
A law coming into force will give the Kremlin greater control over what Russians can access online ahead of a presidential election next March. [Read More]
DUHK attack: vulnerability in outdated X9.31 random number generator allows hackers to recover encryption keys and read VPN and web browsing session data [Read More]
Microsoft drops lawsuit against US government after DoJ issued new rules limiting the use of secrecy orders that prevent firms from telling customers law enforcement accessed their data [Read More]
UK's Financial Conduct Authority launches investigation into massive Equifax breach [Read More]
Proposed European Union ePrivacy regulation, whose goal is to harmonize e-communications confidentiality laws, edges closer to fruition [Read More]
Kaspersky launches new Global Transparency Initiative, which includes independent source code reviews and bug bounties of up to $100,000 [Read More]
Google says roughly two-thirds of the websites loaded through Chrome use HTTPS by default [Read More]
Visa launches ID Intelligence, a new platform that allows card issuers, acquirers and merchants to adopt new biometric methods of their own preference [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.
David Holmes's picture
The portion of encrypted traffic keeps rising, so IT security administrators will be forced to do more SSL decryption if they are to get any value at all out of their fancy security tools.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.