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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Owner of cheating service Ashley Madison offers to pay $11.2 million to settle data breach lawsuits [Read More]
Social media giants like Facebook and WhatsApp will be compelled to share encrypted messages of suspected terrorists and other criminals with Australian police under new laws unveiled Friday. [Read More]
Each year, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) publishes an annual 'Who Has Your Back' analysis of the basic privacy policy of major online service providers. [Read More]
WikiLeaks releases documents describing HighRise, and Android malware used by the CIA to intercept SMS messages [Read More]
Human error led to the personal details of millions of Verizon customers being exposed online, but the telecoms giant has downplayed the incident [Read More]
Apple establishes first data center in China to comply with new cybersecurity law, but promises not to build any backdoors into its systems [Read More]
A group of security researchers proposes a real-time inversion attack against the GMR-2 stream cipher used in satellite phone communication, claiming it is much more efficient than previously devised attacks. [Read More]
Windows 10 users who haven’t installed the Creators Update will soon be notified to review their privacy settings and to install the latest feature update to remain secure, Microsoft announced. [Read More]
The UK's Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has ruled that the Royal Free NHS Foundation Trust contravened the Data Protection Act when it provided the personal data of 1.6 million patients to Google-owned DeepMind. [Read More]
Google notifies employees that their information may have been stolen as a result of the recently discovered Sabre breach [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.
David Holmes's picture
The portion of encrypted traffic keeps rising, so IT security administrators will be forced to do more SSL decryption if they are to get any value at all out of their fancy security tools.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).