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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Bose wireless headphones, collect the listening habits of users via an associated app which data is transmitted to Bose, who then passes the data to a marketing company, a lawsuit alleges. [Read More]
British payday loan company Wonga suffers data breach. The incident could affect up to 270,000 current and former customers [Read More]
The European Parliament adopted a resolution strongly criticizing the EU-US Privacy Shield. [Read More]
When Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey teased that he had joined the world of social media with secret Facebook and Twitter accounts, tech writer Ashley Feinberg took the dare. [Read More]
A hacker gained access to the names, dates of birth and SSNs of job seekers in 10 U.S. states after breaching the systems of America’s JobLink (AJL) [Read More]
The Senate on voted to overturn FCC rules that would prevent ISPs from monetizing customers' information without their consent. [Read More]
The server hosting Android Forums was hacked and the website’s database was accessed. Only 2.5% of active users affected [Read More]
WikiLeaks releases documents describing Apple device hacking tools used by the CIA. Most require physical access to the targeted device [Read More]
Vulnerability in the web versions of WhatsApp and Telegram allowed hackers to hijack accounts by sending a malicious file to the targeted user [Read More]
Facebook this week announced an update to its platform policies to ban developers from using data obtained from the company to build surveillance tools. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.
Gant Redmon's picture
While you can’t do anything about the terms when using a product or service, you can decide whether or not to get into the contractual relationship in the first place and what information you share if you do click through.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Gant Redmon's picture
Parenting, much like our legal system, is founded on three basic steps: 1) establish rules, 2) monitor compliance, and 3) modify non-compliant behavior.
Gant Redmon's picture
In the spirit of "trust but verify", you may occasionally scroll through your kid’s email or Google+ account, or pick up their phone to glance at recent texts. One would think this behavior it protected by law. Surprisingly, wiretap laws don’t have carve outs for parental snooping.
Gant Redmon's picture
By comparing what was creepy a few years back with what is creepy today and asking “why the change,” we will see the commonalities of creepiness and lessons for all who wish to make a successful business involving personal information.