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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

WikiLeaks Vault 7: CIA used software named ELSA to track users’ locations via Wi-Fi [Read More]
Shadow Brokers claim their monthly subscription service is a success and they threatened to expose the identity of a former NSA hacker [Read More]
Google on Friday announced plans to stop scanning the content of consumer Gmail addresses for personalizing the ads it serves to users. [Read More]
After making it available on iOS devices in November 2016, Mozilla this week brought its privacy-focused mobile browser to Android. [Read More]
A group of prominent journalists and activists in Mexico accused the government Monday of spying on them, saying their phones had been hacked with Israeli spyware sold exclusively to the state. [Read More]
WikiLeaks releases details on CherryBlossom, a tool used by the CIA to hack wireless routers and access points [Read More]
Critical infrastructure, and national security, public and private organizations must at least encrypt their data; even if legislators and regulators have to mandate encryption requirements, ICIT says. [Read More]
Chinese authorities say they have uncovered a massive underground operation run by Apple employees selling computer and phone users' personal data. [Read More]
Router and switch LEDs can be used to stealthily exfiltrate sensitive data from air-gapped computers, researchers demonstrate [Read More]
Researcher discovers unprotected Amazon S3 bucket storing sensitive military data belonging to a US combat support and intelligence agency [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.
Gant Redmon's picture
While you can’t do anything about the terms when using a product or service, you can decide whether or not to get into the contractual relationship in the first place and what information you share if you do click through.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Gant Redmon's picture
Parenting, much like our legal system, is founded on three basic steps: 1) establish rules, 2) monitor compliance, and 3) modify non-compliant behavior.
Gant Redmon's picture
In the spirit of "trust but verify", you may occasionally scroll through your kid’s email or Google+ account, or pick up their phone to glance at recent texts. One would think this behavior it protected by law. Surprisingly, wiretap laws don’t have carve outs for parental snooping.