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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Dvmap, a Trojan distributed via Google Play, is the first Android malware that injects malicious code into system runtime libraries [Read More]
Critical authentication bypass vulnerability exposes many WiMAX routers to remote attacks. Patches unlikely any time soon [Read More]
Google is willing to pay up to $200,000 for TrustZone or Verified Boot exploit chains, and will pay up to $150,000 for remote kernel exploits. [Read More]
Dozens of Android applications distributed via the Google Play store have exposed up to 36.5 million users to an auto-clicking adware, Check Point security researchers reveal. [Read More]
Researchers analyzed pacemakers from four major vendors and found that the third-party libraries they use have over 8,000 known vulnerabilities [Read More]
One of the vulnerabilities addressed by Google in its May 2017 security patches allowed the bypass of Nexus 6’s Secure Boot through kernel command-line injection, HCL Technologies researchers reveal. [Read More]
According to a survey, forty-seven percent of respondents "expect to be protected from cyber-attacks by either their company or third-party app developers." [Read More]
Samsung Electronics is investigating claims by a German hacking group that it fooled the iris recognition system of the new flagship Galaxy S8 device, the firm said. [Read More]
A new behavioral authentication product announced by security firm Preempt allows optional multi-factor authentication (MFA), based on user behavior, on any application. [Read More]
C-level executives are by far at the greatest risk of being hacked outside of the office, according to a new report. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Adam Ely's picture
From what to support to how to ensure the security of mobile apps and data, enterprises are banging their heads against the wall to find a solution to secure mobile.
Adam Ely's picture
We can attempt to predict the future, but without proper security measures in place, data breaches are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if a breach will occur, but when.
Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Marc Solomon's picture
To help cybersecurity professionals cut through the hype and gain a better understanding of what to expect as the Internet of Everything continues to evolve, these top 10 observations might help.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.
Adam Ely's picture
Many of us create our own blind spots through assumption. Until we understand what is occurring on mobile devices, we cannot determine if our controls are effective at managing risk.