Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

St. Jude Medical has patched some of the vulnerabilities found by MedSec, but the vendor insists the risk of cyberattacks is extremely low [Read More]
FTC files lawsuit against D-Link, accusing the vendor of making false claims about how secure its products are [Read More]
Netgear launches bug bounty program with payouts of up to $15,000 for vulnerabilities found in routers, cameras and Wi-Fi systems [Read More]
Smart electricity meters continue to pose a serious cybersecurity risk to consumers and utilities. But can hacking lead to explosions? [Read More]
Netgear releases firmware updates to address a critical command injection vulnerability found in its routers [Read More]
IT systems connected to pagers leak data that can be highly valuable for conducting reconnaissance [Read More]
Wi-Fi signals can be exploited to recognize keystrokes and the first system that can do so has been already created, a newly published research paper reveals. [Read More]
Apple has fixed vulnerabilities exploited by a piece of high-end surveillance software, which researchers classify as “the most sophisticated attack seen on any endpoint. [Read More]
Researchers find remote keyless system vulnerabilities that can be leveraged to unlock millions of cars [Read More]
Lack of encryption in many wireless keyboards allows remote hackers to intercept and inject keystrokes in an attack dubbed “KeySniffer” [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Wireless Security

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Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Security is a creature of habit. Security likes things to stay the same. Change brings chaos. Chaos is bad for security. But, we can help control the security of our environment by following good security habits.
Ram Mohan's picture
Do you allow your employees to surf using open wireless networks from their phones or laptops? What are the easiest ways that attackers can sniff email or gain access to corporate information from these devices? What are the best ways to protect corporation information on the go?
Mike Lennon's picture
Enjoy this selection of top picks for 2010, listed in no particular order. Happy New Year!
Markus Jakobsson's picture
In 1998, Intel announced the introduction of processor identities. Anti-fraud practitioners celebrated, security experts busied themselves thinking of the research implications, and privacy advocates were terrified...