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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Just three days after announcing that it would acquire Fireglass, Symantec announced that it would acquire mobile security firm Skycure for an undisclosed sum. [Read More]
A recently discovered Android Trojan can exfiltrate private data from more than 40 applications, Palo Alto Networks security researchers have discovered. [Read More]
Google said that a total of 138 vulnerabilities were addressed in the Android platform with the release of its June 2017 set of security patches. [Read More]
Android file-encrypting ransomware SLocker was recently observed using an interface similar to that of the WannaCry malware that hit Windows systems worldwide last month, TrendMicro security researchers reveal. [Read More]
The Lenovo VIBE smartphone was found to include vulnerabilities that could allow an attacker with physical access to the device to gain root privileges. [Read More]
There are thousands of Android applications containing the label “antivirus,” but a big chunk of them are dangerous programs designed to infect devices of unsuspecting users with malware, RiskIQ warns. [Read More]
Dvmap, a Trojan distributed via Google Play, is the first Android malware that injects malicious code into system runtime libraries [Read More]
Google is willing to pay up to $200,000 for TrustZone or Verified Boot exploit chains, and will pay up to $150,000 for remote kernel exploits. [Read More]
Dozens of Android applications distributed via the Google Play store have exposed up to 36.5 million users to an auto-clicking adware, Check Point security researchers reveal. [Read More]
One of the vulnerabilities addressed by Google in its May 2017 security patches allowed the bypass of Nexus 6’s Secure Boot through kernel command-line injection, HCL Technologies researchers reveal. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.
Adam Ely's picture
The mobile strategist will play a pivotal role in mobile integration, as they pave the way for the organizations to do so purposefully and securely.
David Holmes's picture
After the rounds of predictions for 2014, I had bet my colleague that if no mobile DDoS appeared this year, we’d stop talking about it. And it looks like we can.
Adam Ely's picture
While mobile security remains at the top of every CISO’s priority list this year, enterprises have quickly begun to realize that mobile device management (MDM) and enterprise mobility management (EMM) are not enough to keep data safe.
Adam Ely's picture
From what to support to how to ensure the security of mobile apps and data, enterprises are banging their heads against the wall to find a solution to secure mobile.