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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

BMW, Ford, Infiniti and Nissan cars with a Continental telematics control unit could be vulnerable to remote hacker attacks [Read More]
Several low-cost Android device models were recently found to feature the Triada Trojan built into their firmware, Dr. Web security researchers say. [Read More]
Researchers from China-based Tencent managed to remotely hack a Tesla Model X. The carmaker patched the flaws they exploited [Read More]
After introducing the product at the Google I/O conference in May, Google has now made its Play Protect security services available to all Android users. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities found by researchers in the Segway miniPRO allow hackers to take control of the hoverboard and possibly cause injury to the rider [Read More]
A vulnerability dubbed by researchers Devil’s Ivy could affect millions of security cameras and other IoT devices [Read More]
A newly discovered Android backdoor appears to be based on the OmniRAT remote administration tool (RAT) that targets Android, Windows, Linux and MacOS devices, Trend Micro security researchers warn. [Read More]
WikiLeaks releases documents describing HighRise, and Android malware used by the CIA to intercept SMS messages [Read More]
Just three days after announcing that it would acquire Fireglass, Symantec announced that it would acquire mobile security firm Skycure for an undisclosed sum. [Read More]
A recently discovered Android Trojan can exfiltrate private data from more than 40 applications, Palo Alto Networks security researchers have discovered. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Scott Simkin's picture
Users, networks and applications can – and should— exist everywhere, which puts new burdens on security teams to protect them in the same way as the traditional perimeter.
Alastair Paterson's picture
By understanding what’s up with your mobile apps, you can mitigate the digital risk to your organization, employees and customers.
Adam Ely's picture
In this day of BYOD devices and zero-trust operating environments, IT and security professionals gain nothing from trying to manage the unmanageable—which is just as well, because the device is no longer the endpoint that matters.
Simon Crosby's picture
While flexibility offers countless benefits for corporations and their employees, this new emphasis on mobility has also introduced a new set of risks, and this in turn re-ignites a focus on endpoint security.
Adam Ely's picture
Applying a zero trust model to mobile and the right security controls at the app level could align productivity and security. But the bottom line is that it’s no longer about the device; it’s about the applications.
Adam Ely's picture
The increase in mobile security conversations shows that teams are still trying to figure out their strategy and how to address this new landscape of vulnerabilities.
David Holmes's picture
DDoS continues to wax and wane in unpredictable cycles, but the ecosystem has evolved to keep it out of the mobile space.
Adam Ely's picture
The mobile strategist will play a pivotal role in mobile integration, as they pave the way for the organizations to do so purposefully and securely.
David Holmes's picture
After the rounds of predictions for 2014, I had bet my colleague that if no mobile DDoS appeared this year, we’d stop talking about it. And it looks like we can.
Adam Ely's picture
While mobile security remains at the top of every CISO’s priority list this year, enterprises have quickly begun to realize that mobile device management (MDM) and enterprise mobility management (EMM) are not enough to keep data safe.